Building a Base Mesh pt7: putting it all together

Building a Base Mesh pt7: putting it all together

Finally, I assemble the pieces I created in the previous 6 videos to build the base mesh. The base mesh is based on the 8-head high figure contained in the Andrew Loomis book “Figure Drawing for All It’s worth”.


Building in Base mesh pt 6: Box-modelling ears in Silo

The most complicated part of the base mesh.


Building a Base mesh pt 5: Box-modelling a torso in Silo

Creating a torso by extending a box.


Building in a Base mesh pt 4: Box-modelling eye lids in Silo

Creating eyelids from cylinders.


Building a Base Mesh pt 3: Box-modelling a foot in Silo

Part three of Building a base mesh series. I use two boxes to model a foot and then layout UVs. Take notice that I make sure my foot has an octogon (8-sided polygon) at the top. This will be important when I put the pieces together.


Building a Base Mesh pt 1: Box-modelling a hand in Silo

Happy New Year!

I am beginning a new series where I show how to build a base mesh for sculpting and animation step by step. This mesh will be designed to use fewer polygons for better subdivision. This first part shows how to build a hand. I’ve created two versions of the tutorial, one with no words the other with verbal and written descriptions. I’m hoping the non-verbal version will be useful for non-English speakers. Please let me know in the comments which version you prefer.



Bammes Skeleton

After taking the excellent human anatomy courses by Scott Eaton (July-August 2015), I decided to investigate further one of his favorite artists: Gottfried Bammes (1920-2007). Bammes was a professor of art at the Dresden Academy of Fine Art and is most well know for his anatomy books in particular Die Gestalt des Menschen (The Form of Man). He shows how to construct the skeleton and muscles from basic shapes. I attempted to mimic Bammes method in the embedded video using my 3D software ZBrush and Silo.


Making All Quad Meshes

Quad is short for quadrilateral, a 4 sided shape. Quad meshes are ideal for digital sculpting and 3d animation. Sculpting on a mesh with a mixture of quads and non quads can result in pinching and sharp angles in unwanted areas. Here I present some cases where polygons can be converted into quads.

1) Quad adjacent to a triangle
Add a line in the centre of the quad.
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

2) Two Quads adjacent to a pentagon (5 sided polygon)
Add a line to the centre of the pentagon.
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) septagon (7 sided polygon) sandwiched between 4 quads and 2 quads
Split the septagon as shown.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4) Ring of triangles (even number)
Remove half the lines to merge triangles into quads.

 

 

 

 

 

 

5) Ring of Triangles (odd number)
Remove half the lines and add a point to the remaining triangle.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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